mccue90:

calleo:

highenergyjewtrino:

A friend linked me these because he thought they’d be relevant to me, he was extremely correct.  If these pieces of advice aren’t relevant to you, improve yourself until they are.

[source]

A good chunk of Tumblr could benefit from this.

That last one tho’

3k626ekful7ozxujar43keiw236in2h:

hoodbypussy:

Évolution inversée

at first i was really confused bc I thought it was supposed to be a painting of him when he was 14 years old

fyblackwomenart:

"Kirikou and the Sorceress" is a 1998 traditional animation feature film written and directed by Michel Ocelot. Drawn from elements of West African folk tales, it depicts how a newborn boy, Kirikou, saves his village from the evil witch Karaba.

fyblackwomenart:

"Kirikou and the Sorceress" is a 1998 traditional animation feature film written and directed by Michel Ocelot. Drawn from elements of West African folk tales, it depicts how a newborn boy, Kirikou, saves his village from the evil witch Karaba.

thisismyitaly:

Porto di Desenzano.

thisismyitaly:

Porto di Desenzano.

The Winged Victory of Samothrace

also called the Nike of Samothrace, is a 2nd century BC marble sculpture of the Greek goddess Nike (Victory). Since 1884, it has been prominently displayed at the Louvre and is one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world. H.W. Janson described it as “the greatest masterpiece of Hellenistic sculpture.”

Paolo Viscardi reveals what it takes to make a convincing, fake mermaid

Name: The Horniman merman
Species: Pseudosiren paradoxoides
Dates: mid- to late-19th century
Claim to fame: Iconic specimen
Where now: Horniman Museum & Gardens

brudesworld:

Kay Nielsen illustration for The Story of a Mother, 1923

brudesworld:

Kay Nielsen illustration for The Story of a Mother, 1923

youngparis:

Cocoon and Evolved Metallic Mechanitis Butterfly Chrysalis from Costa Rica

archimaps:

Design for the Pawtucket Free Public Library

archimaps:

Design for the Pawtucket Free Public Library

rihistoricalsociety:

Nancy Elizabeth Prophet: Rhode Island Black Artist
As part of Gallery Night Providence, on Thursday April 17, The Rhode Island Historical Society,in partnership with the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society, hosts an opening reception for an exhibit on Rhode Island sculptor Nancy Elizabeth Prophet, RISD’s first African American graduate in 1918. The multi-sensory exhibit draws on artifacts from Rhode Island College, RISD, Brown University’s John Hay Library, the Newport Art Museum and the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society, using photographs, letters, art and audio selections from Prophet’s Paris dairy. A replica of Prophet’s studio and a pedestal with unmodeled clay will allow viewers to be aspiring sculptors. Museum goers may also explore 1920s Paris and Providence through items from the Society’s collection.  The exhibit is funded by the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities and sponsored by Opera Providence.
Upon graduating from RISD, Prophet attempted exhibiting in regional galleries, but when her skin color became a bar to entrance, Prophet chose to go Paris to study sculpture at L’Ecole des Beaux Arts under financial assistance from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. After twelve years and international acclaim, Prophet returned to the states to teach art at Spelman College in Atlanta. In 1945, coming back to Rhode Island, she attempted to revive her career, but other than an exhibit at the Providence Public Library, she was forced to resort to domestic work and died in obscurity.
For more information about the exhibit, visit rihs.org email programs@rihs.org.
For more information about the Gallery Night guided tours, see Gallery Night Providence.

rihistoricalsociety:

Nancy Elizabeth Prophet: Rhode Island Black Artist

As part of Gallery Night Providence, on Thursday April 17, The Rhode Island Historical Society,in partnership with the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society, hosts an opening reception for an exhibit on Rhode Island sculptor Nancy Elizabeth Prophet, RISD’s first African American graduate in 1918. The multi-sensory exhibit draws on artifacts from Rhode Island College, RISD, Brown University’s John Hay Library, the Newport Art Museum and the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society, using photographs, letters, art and audio selections from Prophet’s Paris dairy. A replica of Prophet’s studio and a pedestal with unmodeled clay will allow viewers to be aspiring sculptors. Museum goers may also explore 1920s Paris and Providence through items from the Society’s collection.  The exhibit is funded by the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities and sponsored by Opera Providence.

Upon graduating from RISD, Prophet attempted exhibiting in regional galleries, but when her skin color became a bar to entrance, Prophet chose to go Paris to study sculpture at L’Ecole des Beaux Arts under financial assistance from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. After twelve years and international acclaim, Prophet returned to the states to teach art at Spelman College in Atlanta. In 1945, coming back to Rhode Island, she attempted to revive her career, but other than an exhibit at the Providence Public Library, she was forced to resort to domestic work and died in obscurity.

For more information about the exhibit, visit rihs.org email programs@rihs.org.

For more information about the Gallery Night guided tours, see Gallery Night Providence.

rihistoricalsociety:

A few photos from our March 1 walking tour of Providence’s historic Elmwood neighborhood. The still-cold weather didn’t stop nearly 40 members of the community from meeting at the front steps of the Knight Memorial Library to join us for an overview of the neighborhood’s history and historic architecture. 

Many thanks to the Friends of the Knight Memorial Library and the Elmwood Neighborhood Association for working with us to make this walk the wonderful event that it was. 

inkfromtheoctopus:

GET IN LOSER, WERE GOING SHOPPING

jewishpolitics:

givemeinternet:

Shhh it’s starting

Well…um…this is concerning. 

jewishpolitics:

givemeinternet:

Shhh it’s starting

Well…um…this is concerning.